Notes on Student Self Determination

A recent Edutopia post by Beth Holland on Student Agency rekindled thoughts and inspired me….A quote from the post featuring JSB, a man I have learned so much from :
Since the Middle Ages, individuals looking to become masters of particular subjects engaged in apprenticeships. In this role, they not only gained procedural knowledge, but also became enculturated into the community of practice. John Seely-Brown, Allan Collins, and Paul Duguid suggested applying this concept to the classroom through cognitive apprenticeships in the 1980s. They argued that school removed context from learning, as classroom culture does not mirror real-world culture
The locus of the article was on the history of the future of what Beth calls student agency in the post. Invoking a wide range of scholar practitioners from Dewey to Cuban and an assortment of talented teachers, the article seems to tug at a topic I care so deeply about.  I hope you might read the article and add to the many current iterations of student self determination in schools. Motions are afoot to make the (re)catalyst praxis showing up today into the pathways of innovation that are so vital for humanity, citizenship, and problem solving for a time of opportunity and crisis that await today’s young people.
Below are some selected resources to further inspire and a post I wrote in 2013 for an experiential conference that gathered many titans in democratic education, student directed project based learning and field studies– it was an incredible experience spanning a coastal lake, kayaking on the coast of Maine and 14+ hours of learning, design and experience. May this serve as a near history extension of Beth’s article for your near future designs that hold students as self determined, and yes critical agents in their own learning in the real world.

Opening Remarks KWEC13

Student  driven education is a burgeoning field today in light of the social,  economic and environmental landscapes of a century facing rapid change.  Knowing that education is a social construct that must be built and  tended, schools and organizations are looking to designs, research and  practice that allow for systemic change in education toward more  personalized, potent and useful learning environments. Indeed, McKenzie (2013)  writes of a new more experiential education in independent schools  allowing students the chance to collaborate and take risks. He writes  “without question, experiential learning enhances scholastic  learning….this type of learning builds confidence, encourages risk  taking, reduces the fear of failure, gives oxygen to collaboration,  nurtures imagination, promotes problem solving, allows reverie, and  grows a taproot from which scholastic learning flowers”. These are bold  assertions and he is not alone in his view of education. Learning  scientists, teachers and administrators, parents and  students see the  possibilities of a learning landscape deeply changed and salient to the  future.
The Kieve-Wavus Educators’ Conference (KWEC)  is an active 4 day excursion into the theory, design and practice of  student driven learning.  The conference focuses three main strands of  student driven education: Curriculum Integration, Student Driven Project  Based Learning and Field Studies. Within each of these strands lay the rhizomatic  fields of 21st century education.  We will set a tone for the  possibilities in education through a close look at curriculum  integration as a way to orient learner toward to student and community  and away from the department or institution. In the common practice of  driving our own project we will practice the skills necessary to  scaffold deep learning in young people without the need to deliver and  control the environment.  Through moving into field studies, we will  explore our world as learners living education.  For each of these  experiences, a theory starts the conversation.  We offer the following  sections as a conference “theory” knowing that we are covering only a  small piece of the research behind each topic.  We hope it serves the  conference in starting a conversation and fuels the further research,  design and praxis of KWEC 13 and well beyond.
Conference Strands: A Theory, Design and Praxis
  • Curriculum integration
“young  people have a right to be intelligent, to be well informed, to search  for meaning in the world, to be engaged in significant issues, to do  authentic work, to learn the whole story, to think critically, to form  [and clarify] values, to make judgements, and to be respected….”
-Beane
At the root of student driven education is an exploration of meaning in an individuals personal and  social world. Knowledge can then be integrated in explanatory,  technical, personal and social ways through projects, field studies and  beyond.  Curriculum integration, researched and practiced first by  educational thinkers in the early 20th century (Dewey, Smith,  Kilpatrick), has remained a solid philosophy and praxis well into the  21st century.  Dewey (1905) writes of relating school to life as a natural path to integration,
“alI  studies grow out of relations in the one great common world. When the  child lives in varied but concrete and active relationship to this  common world, [their] studies are naturally unified. It will no longer  be a problem to correlate studies. The teacher will not have to resort  to all sorts of devices to weave a little arithmetic into the history  lesson, and the like. Relate the school to life, and all studies are of  necessity correlated.”
Conversely, in his book Curriculum Integration: Designing the Core of Democratic Learning,  Beane (1997) writes clearly that,
“….in  curriculum integration, knowledge from the disciplines is repositioned  into the context of the theme, questions, and activities at hand. Even when teaching and learning move into what looks like discipline-based  instruction, they are always done explicitly in the context of the theme  and for a reason driven by it. It is here that knowledge comes to life,  here where it has meaning, and here where it is more likely to be “learned.”
Dewey and Beane offer solutions in theory and  example to tremendous questions about education. Erudite questions,  posed by educators like Zhao (2012) , Wagner (2010)  (2012) Lichtman (2010) , Martinez and Stager (2013)  and others along with teams of dedicated educators and their  communities have a commonality. How do we address the needs of a rapidly  changing world through education that prepares young people for it.  In seeking ways to give students more control of learning they also recognize that tradition and culture are vital and different in communities everywhere. Curriculum integration allows for tradition and  community to be first and delivery methods of knowledge  secondary.
KWEC 13 is designed with curriculum  integration in mind. The personal and social concerns of educators are  foremost in our plans and actions, while the separate disciplines and  schedules for learning of the 20th century school are not given weight.   Curriculum integration at KWEC 13 will offer a glimpse into another way to experience education. Starting on the first full day of the  conference we will:
  • Review the core of curriculum integration
  • Collaboratively  plan the conference by engaging two essential conference related  questions with an overarching theme of Student Driven Education:
            -“What questions and concerns do you have about yourself as an educator?”
            -“What questions do you have about education and the world?”
            
  • Student Directed Project Based Learning
“A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn no other way”
 -Twain
                                                                                                               
Student driven project based learning is a proven practice for student driven education that presents  students with new situations in learning to carry out and explore the  personal and social concerns they have. The work done in project  learning of this kind, creates conditions for significant transfer of  knowledge, skills, and understanding. Student driven projects support  learning in real-world problem solving, and engaged understanding in  varied ways. Projects develop through a dialogue between the students,  faculty, administration and community members and reveal the underlying  questions, the genuine interest, and possible pathways to carry out  extensive knowledge building that is rigorous, relevant and connected.   There are many models of PBL in education and it is good to situate our  conference amidst them.  Yong Zhao (2012) curates an enormous research  profile on PBL in his World Class Learners: Educating Creative and  Entrepreneurial Students. He narrows the research into three general  descriptions of PBL as a starting points:
  • academic PBL that is primarily classroom based, content driven, single subject and teacher led
  • mixed  models where teacher and student collaboration through groups is key  and a product is sought within the constraint of academic disciplines  inside and outside of a school
  • entreprenurship  models that are completely student led, focused on a product with the  teacher serving as venture capitalist, consultant, and motivator and  focus group. Academic disciplines emerge out of need and feedback.
At KWEC the student driven PBL we will design together is based on The Bridge Year and Edvisions  designs for PBL (closest to Zhao’s entrepreneurship model.)  As we  create our own projects as a vital structure and component of the  conference, we will experience the practice, process and requirements  for effective student driven learning. Starting on the first full day of  the conference we will:
  • review student directed PBL and Project Foundry, the software that most easily scaffolds the process well.
  • write a summary of our project in less than a page, often a good paragraph
  • create guiding questions that focus the inquiry and research
  • assess prior knowledge and a clear delineation of knowledge, skills, and understanding needed to carry out the project
  • create a plan to address gaps in prior knowledge and gain needed capacity for completing project
  • define assessment Tools
  • list Resources needed (human, print, technology, personal experience)
  • create timelines, sequence tasks, protocol for assessment.
  • plan for a product to benefit the field of student driven learning
  • Field Studies
“Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing there is a field. I’ll meet you there.”
                                                                                                                        -Rumi
                                                                                                                        
Field Studies enable students to “ground truth” their thinking through research that is multi-sited or in  the field as opposed to a fixed location and explore the landscape  freely to learn. Field studies offer the student researcher a chance to  gather data off campus and in real world contexts. Field Studies also  support student research and progress toward project objectives by providing opportunities for students to access a broad array experiences  and experts while studying a variety of communities and ecosystems;  lending depth and variability to project research (collect, analyze and  reflect on data and reporting). Student field studies like those offered  at The Bridge Year will use geospacial mapping, ethnography, ecosystem sampling and other techniques to better understand individual or group  projects and the broader ecology society and economy of regions (local,  regional and global). Field Studies couple research and peer  collaboration with social and physical challenges ranging from extensive  canoe and kayak based travel, hiking and more. As Roberts (2012)  posits, these experiences provide a field of learning and “fields do not presume homogeneity or consensus, only a common space within which  questions are raised, answers are sought, and the overall inquiry is  engaged.” Our process for field studies at KWEC 13 will be active,  engage our personal and social questions about education and give ample  time for practice in the technology and methods considered.   As part of  the conference we will:
  • introduce and  review field studies concepts, and activities along with powerful yet  simple apps that allow for robust field study data collection, mapping  and sharing.  We will also look at ways to field studies can be deployed  without machines.
  • discuss learning and landscape from the perspective of student driven learning.
  • explore  the botany, geology, wildlife, history and culture, management of lands  and    ecological connections in Midcoast Maine by motor vessel, kayak  and on foot.
  • work individually or together to keep a field portfolio of our gathered data and reflections on the conference.
  • Welcome to KWEC 13
At  Kieve-Wavus Education, we launch the Bridge Year with the solid belief  that young people given a chance to live their learning will lead  informed and  active lives as  individuals in community around the  world. With this same sentiment, we convene and welcome you to the first  annual Kieve-Wavus Educators’ Conference at the Kennedy Learning Center  this week.  If you can not be with us, please follow the conference  from afar and allow the combined research curated in the KWEC Wiki to  inspire your learning environment and to inspire you to join us next  year.
 
Reprinted here from The Bridge Year Emergence Blogpost Kieve-Wavus Educators Conference 

Keep thinking, imagining, hoping and acting

Reading notes 14 November:

Boulding (1990) Building a Global Civic Culture: Education for an Interdependent World again…..

Imagining how events could be otherwise than they are is a hallmark freedom and power of human beings. Making social imagination work for us involves us in new concepts and principles, in new ways of using our minds to grasp complexities we do not yet comprehend. Thinking this way helps us construct new social realities both locally and globally. Social imagination is not merely for the sake of of academic knowing; it must include our feelings, and it must include our acting.

IMG_1492

Hahn (1940) The Love of Enterprise, The Love of Aloneness, The Love of Skill 

IF it be true that Education can heal the State, then indeed we educators have a grave and anxious responsibility.

and Ruitenberg (2005)

If one wishes to educate students to have a commitment to their social and ecological environment, one needs to start with an emphasis on commitment rather than on locality or community. Despite the commonly used metaphor, human beings do not grow actual roots on which they depend for their physical, intellectual, or ethical nourishment. Instead, nomads who have learned the ethical gestures of hospitality and openness to a community-to-come will bring nourishment to any place in which they land.

                                                                                                               
Valve1

“Thanks for being here. Let’s make great things.”

A few notes (of many) on Valve’s Employee Handbook.

We want innovators, and that means maintaining an environment where they’ll flourish

Never be afraid to run an experiment or to collect more data.

This company is yours to steer—toward opportunities and away from risks. You have the power to green-light projects. You have the power to….

Why does your desk have wheels?

You were hired to constantly be looking around for the most valuable work you could be doing.

Nobody expects you to devote time to every opportunity that comes your way. Instead, we want you to learn how to choose the most important work to do.

Yes. There’s no secret decision-making cabal. No matter what project, you’re already invited. All you have to do is either (1) Start working on it, or (2) Start talking to all the people who you think might be working on it already and find out how to best be valuable. You will be welcomed— there is no approval process or red tape involved. Quite the opposite—it’s your job to insert yourself wherever you think you should be.

Sometimes things around the office can seem a little too good to be true. If you find yourself walking down the hall one morning with a bowl of fresh fruit and Stump- town-roasted espresso, dropping off your laundry to be washed, and heading into one of the massage rooms, don’t freak out. All these things are here for you to actually use. And don’t worry that somebody’s going to judge you for taking advantage of it—relax! And if you stop on the way back from your massage to play darts or work out in the Valve gym or whatever, it’s not a sign that this place is going to come crumbling down like some 1999-era dot-com start- up. If we ever institute caviar-catered lunches, though, then maybe something’s wrong. Definitely panic if there’s caviar.

Over time, we have learned that our collective ability to meet challenges, take advantage of opportunity, and respond to threats is far greater when the responsibility for doing so is distributed as widely as possible. Namely, to every individual at the company.

We all need feedback about our performance—in order to improve, and in order to know we’re not failing. Once a year we all give each other feedback about our work. Outside of these formalized peer reviews, the expectation is that we’ll just pull feedback from those around us when- ever we need to.

You’ve solved the nuts-and-bolts issues. Now you’re moving beyond wanting to just be productive day to day—you’re ready to help shape your future, and Valve’s.

Everyone is a designer. Every- one can question each other’s work.

Would I want this person to be my boss?; Would I learn a significant amount from him or her?; What if this person went to work for our competition?

Valve will be a different company a few years from now because you are going to change it for the better. We can’t wait to see where you take us.

Liard-River-Nahanni_Ranges

Paths, Modes and Moments

ff12-brown

Still captivated by this slide from John Seely Brown. Carla’s adroit projections for the theory of knowledge are so prescient and useful.

5954123929_549f4481a6_o

Dragons, Imagination and Curriculum Integration

Imagining how events could be otherwise than they are is a hallmark freedom and power of human beings

D. Bob Gowin (1988)1

Many educational projects today are trying so very hard and nobly to mutate: to rescue, bypass, reconfigure and support–provide more than a catalyst, cool project or amazing school specific feat. The projects are seeking more, prototyping like mad and gaining grounds in certain spaces–I am wildly impressed by many.  My hopes for you, for us, is that we face our dragons. Take a look at Bruce Sterlings NEXT talk from minute 8:58-  With a brilliant critical voice, a pin drop hearing claim, and a passionate tenacity he implores a group of the best and the brightest (like you), to look up, look at the system, deeply question–yes keep questioning. Be forewarned, Bruce does not coddle, he offers critical deliberation for a complex world. But my point is not to posit yet another schools and sky’s falling argument. I want you to look up and ask yourself why the copier is still so important, why meetings are still so long, why that schedule is still not working, why the kids–even given control– are still only as good as the control given…. why they are still only engaging in “school”…. do the school and its processes exist for the students future? These, and so much more you see and feel as educators — are your dragons.

Before you undertake another school revision, plan, proposal, design or development please do the following.

In a safe and caring space spend a few hours minimum asking kids what their self and social concerns are. Have them write these concerns on a wall or in an online discussion. Their souls are churning; their adolescence, ever-present, but trust that the world they know, they may not show in school.  When the writable surfaces on walls, discussion forums online and all in between (and beyond) are filled with life, pull colleagues with domain knowledge in all of the core subjects together to read and discuss. Agree on how creating projects from the life on those walls/spaces might meet all of your teacher/school objectives.

As elders, guides and yes, teachers you can support young people as they are involved and engaged in an enormous range of knowledge, from information to values clarification, and including content and skills from all disciplines of knowledge–integrated in the context of themes and activities within them.  The topics you see written on the walls are organizing centers, significant problems or issues that connect the curriculum to the larger world. These centers serve as a context for unifying knowledge.  Knowledge in turn is developed as it is instrumentally applied to exploring the organizing centers; Personal Knowledge: Addressing self concerns and ways of knowing about self; Social Knowledge: addressing social and world issues, from peer to global relationships, and ways of critically examining these; Explanatory Knowledge: content that names, describes, explains, and interprets, including that involved in the disciplines of knowledge as well as commonsense or popular knowledge and Technical/Twenty First Century Knowledge: ways of investigating, communicating, analyzing, and expressing. Finding,Validating, Leveraging, and Synthesizing Information; Communicating, collaboration and problem solving in a technologically rich environment.2

I would love to hear about your experiments and findings.

1.Boulding, E. (1990) Building a Global Civic Culture: Education for an Interdependent World
2. For more in this current of thought see Beane (1997) ‘Curriculum Integration: Designing the Core of Democratic Education’ essential reading.

 

 

knotimage

Sailing Ships and Building Pyramids

Seymour Papert has been on my mind (again) for some time now and a talk he gave in Australia, kindly curated by Gary Stager continues to stun me.

Not unusual for Papert, his forcefulness around topics of education, computers and mathematics flow through the talk and one is left looking at machines anew (again). But that is not what resonated for me this time.  Rather it was two statements at vastly different parts of the talk that I would like to briefly explore.

1. At minute 8.41, Papert speaks of educational change as “a very complicated social movement….[that]should be thought of as a complex system”….and goes on to propose the need for and a definition of a revolutionary in education:

(9.40) I don’t think of a revolutionary as someone who wants to force change, but one who looks far enough ahead to see that there is going to be change, fundamental change …

Fundamental change he argues, is out beyond the horizon of transformation. A Decade after Papert posits this are you looking ahead “far enough” do you see fundamental change? Is it upon us? Are you reading, networking and thinking daily about education as a complicated social movement– a complex system?

2. As Papert argues the salience of machines for teaching in this talk and for active learning, at one point he seems to open a dialectic and then veers away. He states, while addressing the active learning which mathematics was taught through in centuries past–

we cannot let kids sail seas and build pyramids anymore….

My mind raced, and heart pounded–yes we can, and I argue we should! Perhaps its the “2004” that Papert was within, perhaps he meant to inspire, perhaps it was a slipped metaphor, but no matter.  Today, we are in a time of insatiable opportunity.  A time where machines can be built by kids, and kids can write their own operating systems (as Papert states in the talk is a true test of computer use). Further, there are Labs like the Future Cities Lab , Superflux and Near Futures Laboratory along with so many other university, city, region and countrywide initiatives in research and design that are presenting incredible growth in society, media, computing and culture.

But importantly, kids can and should sail the seas and build the next pyramids to learn. This may be by computer inside a school–but more, I believe it will be a blend of spaces outside and in. Designing, prototyping and building–indeed our kids are doing this daily already through games, at home and in certain schools but we should be ready for more, much more. Keep working on what the new learning ecologies will look like for students young and old, keep designing, looking ahead, opening our minds to active, deep and experiential learning in 2015.

And there is no need to force change. In an incredibly honest and needed blogpostPeter Gow argues so adroitly about why we need not belittle what has been or is in education as new ecologies of learning emerge.  As another colleague Grant Lichtman argues in his book #Edjourney , educational mutation will be a vision and manifestation of the great middle grounds of education and experience in the 21st century.  Keep sailing–keep building.

 

GENSLER PANEL: steelemaley4.001

Prototyping the Future

GENSLER Slides: PDF

2014-11-16_1204

Towards Knowing, Making and Playing

Seely Brown, J. (2012)

Worth another look. I suggest Min 8:50-on as points to consider closely:

 

IMG_5899

Experiential Education: The Future Revisited

A recent post by Jackie Gerstein Inspired me to reprint my opening remarks for The Kieve-Wavus Educators Conference in 2013.  A dear project of mine and colleagues, The Bridge Year was born upon a burning desire to blend scholastics and experience in education– a middle ground between tradition and innovation for the future of education.  As we each manifest this work in new ways, the core remains…. a story to continue and be built.

Open Remarks KWEC 13

Lake Damariscotta, Maine
Student  driven education is a burgeoning field today in light of the social,  economic and environmental landscapes of a century facing rapid change.  Knowing that education is a social construct that must be built and tended, schools and organizations are looking to designs, research and  practice that allow for systemic change in education toward more  personalized, potent and useful learning environments. Indeed, McKenzie (2013)  writes of a new more experiential education in independent schools  allowing students the chance to collaborate and take risks. He writes:
  without question, experiential learning enhances scholastic  learning….this type of learning builds confidence, encourages risk  taking, reduces the fear of failure, gives oxygen to collaboration,  nurtures imagination, promotes problem solving, allows reverie, and  grows a taproot from which scholastic learning flowers.
These are bold  assertions and he is not alone in his view of education. Learning  scientists, teachers and administrators, parents and  students see the  possibilities of a learning landscape deeply changed and salient to the  future.
The Kieve-Wavus Educators’ Conference (KWEC)  is an active 4 day excursion into the theory, design and practice of  student driven learning.  The conference focuses three main strands of  student driven education: Curriculum Integration, Student Driven Project  Based Learning and Field Studies. Within each of these strands lay the rhizomatic  fields of 21st century education.  We will set a tone for the  possibilities in education through a close look at curriculum  integration as a way to orient learner toward to student and community  and away from the department or institution. In the common practice of  driving our own project we will practice the skills necessary to  scaffold deep learning in young people without the need to deliver and  control the environment.  Through moving into field studies, we will  explore our world as learners living education.  For each of these  experiences, a theory starts the conversation.  We offer the following  sections as a conference “theory” knowing that we are covering only a  small piece of the research behind each topic.  We hope it serves the  conference in starting a conversation and fuels the further research,  design and praxis of KWEC 13 and well beyond.

Conference Strands: A Theory, Design and Praxis

Curriculum integration

young  people have a right to be intelligent, to be well informed, to search  for meaning in the world, to be engaged in significant issues, to do  authentic work, to learn the whole story, to think critically, to form  [and clarify] values, to make judgements, and to be respected….
                                                 -Beane
At the root of student driven education is an exploration of meaning in an individuals personal and  social world. Knowledge can then be integrated in explanatory,  technical, personal and social ways through projects, field studies and  beyond.  Curriculum integration, researched and practiced first by  educational thinkers in the early 20th century (Dewey, Smith,  Kilpatrick), has remained a solid philosophy and praxis well into the  21st century.  Dewey (1905) writes of relating school to life as a natural path to integration,
alI  studies grow out of relations in the one great common world. When the  child lives in varied but concrete and active relationship to this  common world, [their] studies are naturally unified. It will no longer  be a problem to correlate studies. The teacher will not have to resort  to all sorts of devices to weave a little arithmetic into the history  lesson, and the like. Relate the school to life, and all studies are of  necessity correlated.
Conversely, in his book Curriculum Integration: Designing the Core of Democratic Learning,  Beane (1997) writes clearly that,
….in  curriculum integration, knowledge from the disciplines is repositioned  into the context of the theme, questions, and activities at hand. Even when teaching and learning move into what looks like discipline-based  instruction, they are always done explicitly in the context of the theme  and for a reason driven by it. It is here that knowledge comes to life,  here where it has meaning, and here where it is more likely to be learned.”
Dewey and Beane offer solutions in theory and  example to tremendous questions about education. Erudite questions,  posed by educators like Zhao (2012) , Wagner (2010)  (2012) Lichtman (2010) , Martinez and Stager (2013)  and others along with teams of dedicated educators and their  communities have a commonality. How do we address the needs of a rapidly  changing world through education that prepares young people for it.  In seeking ways to give students more control of learning they also recognize that tradition and culture are vital and different in communities everywhere. Curriculum integration allows for tradition and  community to be first and delivery methods of knowledge  secondary.
KWEC 13 is designed with curriculum  integration in mind. The personal and social concerns of educators are  foremost in our plans and actions, while the separate disciplines and  schedules for learning of the 20th century school are not given weight.   Curriculum integration at KWEC 13 will offer a glimpse into another way to experience education. Starting on the first full day of the  conference we will:
  • Review the core of curriculum integration
  • Collaboratively  plan the conference by engaging two essential conference related  questions with an overarching theme of Student Driven Education:
            -“What questions and concerns do you have about yourself as an educator?”
            -“What questions do you have about education and the world?”
            

Student Directed Project Based Learning

A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn no other way
                                               -Twain
                                                                                                               
Student driven project based learning is a proven practice for student driven education that presents  students with new situations in learning to carry out and explore the  personal and social concerns they have. The work done in project  learning of this kind, creates conditions for significant transfer of  knowledge, skills, and understanding. Student driven projects support  learning in real-world problem solving, and engaged understanding in  varied ways. Projects develop through a dialogue between the students,  faculty, administration and community members and reveal the underlying  questions, the genuine interest, and possible pathways to carry out  extensive knowledge building that is rigorous, relevant and connected.  
There are many models of PBL in education and it is good to situate our  conference amidst them.  Yong Zhao (2012) curates an enormous research  profile on PBL in his World Class Learners: Educating Creative and  Entrepreneurial Students. He narrows the research into three general  descriptions of PBL as a starting points:
  • academic PBL that is primarily classroom based, content driven, single subject and teacher led
  • mixed  models where teacher and student collaboration through groups is key  and a product is sought within the constraint of academic disciplines  inside and outside of a school
  • entrepreneurship  models that are completely student led, focused on a product with the  teacher serving as venture capitalist, consultant, and motivator and  focus group. Academic disciplines emerge out of need and feedback.
At KWEC the student driven PBL we will design together is based on The Bridge Year and Edvisions  designs for PBL (closest to Zhao’s entrepreneurship model.)  As we  create our own projects as a vital structure and component of the  conference, we will experience the practice, process and requirements  for effective student driven learning. Starting on the first full day of  the conference we will:
  • review student directed PBL and Project Foundry, the software that most easily scaffolds the process well.
  • write a summary of our project in less than a page, often a good paragraph
  • create guiding questions that focus the inquiry and research
  • assess prior knowledge and a clear delineation of knowledge, skills, and understanding needed to carry out the project
  • create a plan to address gaps in prior knowledge and gain needed capacity for completing project
  • define assessment Tools
  • list Resources needed (human, print, technology, personal experience)
  • create timelines, sequence tasks, protocol for assessment.
  • plan for a product to benefit the field of student driven learning

Field Studies

Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing there is a field. I’ll meet you there.
                                                        -Rumi
                                                                                                                        
Field Studies enable students to “ground truth” their thinking through research that is multi-sited or in  the field as opposed to a fixed location and explore the landscape  freely to learn. Field studies offer the student researcher a chance to  gather data off campus and in real world contexts. Field Studies also  support student research and progress toward project objectives by providing opportunities for students to access a broad array experiences  and experts while studying a variety of communities and ecosystems;  lending depth and variability to project research (collect, analyze and  reflect on data and reporting). Student field studies like those offered  at The Bridge Year will use geospacial mapping, ethnography, ecosystem sampling and other techniques to better understand individual or group  projects and the broader ecology society and economy of regions (local,  regional and global).
Field Studies couple research and peer  collaboration with social and physical challenges ranging from extensive  canoe and kayak based travel, hiking and more. As Roberts (2012)  posits, these experiences provide a field of learning and “fields do not presume homogeneity or consensus, only a common space within which  questions are raised, answers are sought, and the overall inquiry is  engaged.” Our process for field studies at KWEC 13 will be active,  engage our personal and social questions about education and give ample  time for practice in the technology and methods considered.   As part of  the conference we will:
  • introduce and  review field studies concepts, and activities along with powerful yet  simple apps that allow for robust field study data collection, mapping  and sharing.  We will also look at ways to field studies can be deployed  without machines.
  • discuss learning and landscape from the perspective of student driven learning.
  • explore  the botany, geology, wildlife, history and culture, management of lands  and    ecological connections in Midcoast Maine by motor vessel, kayak  and on foot.
  • work individually or together to keep a field portfolio of our gathered data and reflections on the conference.

Welcome to KWEC 13

At  Kieve-Wavus Education, we launch the Bridge Year with the solid belief  that young people given a chance to live their learning will lead  informed and  active lives as  individuals in community around the  world. With this same sentiment, we convene and welcome you to the first  annual Kieve-Wavus Educators’ Conference at the Kennedy Learning Center  this week.  If you can not be with us, please follow the conference  from afar and allow the combined research curated in the KWEC Wiki to  inspire your learning environment and to inspire you to join us next  year.
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General Reading in the Field of Experiential Education

Thank you to all who are forwarding experience and education– See you at ISEEN 15 or in network.
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Seeing Experience

As I was writing today and  listening to Rdio a song came across the airwaves that at once made my heart fly and soul sing for seeing experience.  As a teacher, I can still see myself sitting for the closing ceremony of a large Ivy League Model United Nations conference. My first year team–all Freshman in High School along with a brave lone Junior would not take home a coveted “gavel” or even an award that year. As an adviser, I had dealt with the messiness of teens–actually thousands in one place. Elevators jammed while one of our delegates was disabled and on the 11 floor, our most intellectual yet free spirited student getting lost and so much more evaporated as the closing slideshow started.  While Coldplays “Yellow” filled the hall, I became emotional as I watched image after image of kids collaborating, deliberating, dealing with life’s drama and having fun while learning.

I was seeing experience and scholastics at confluence.

This and so many more experiences are interwoven in me, I cannot let them go:

  • Looking back onto devils pass in the Chugach Range to see a group of high-schoolers walking mountains with the broadest smiles of their lives.
  • Years of messy project based learning, driven by kids and their passion– yes– interdisciplinary projects in the social sciences, humanities, maths and beyond.
  • Years of Exhibitions of Mastery: Kids defending their passions and work to professionals, the community and world.
  • The nervous anticipation of the Georgetown Acceptance Letter that came for a student, who submitted an ePortfolio of mastery for his personalized a co-designed high school.

Don’t let go of what you see that makes your heart fly and soul sing in education.  Let it sink in, drive your work, drive your life.

Turn your catalysts into pathways.